Thursday August 21, 2014





Looking at where anti-Kony money goes

Re: the article “Power of Convictions, Marc h 19,” highlighting the Stop Kony 2012 movement.

I can understand the ignorance and the need to find a hero in today’s world, by teenagers. What I fail to comprehend is the lack of knowledge with media reporting on what is happening in such places like Uganda and the Congo, and instead investing in hyperbole.

With now over 90 million hits on YouTube, this video went viral very fast. What I found from trying to watch much of it was the rhetoric implanted throughout.

With 10 years of ongoing documentaries and most likely high financial expenditures, the Invisible Children has recently utilized social mass media to specifically target the younger generation, coming into awareness of carnage such as what is happening in Uganda, to purchase a ‘kit’ containing various posters, bracelets, etc. for $30 each.

Apparently, 500,000 were produced and sold out fast. That amounts to $15 million in an amazing short time. My guess is they are quickly constructing more.

I perused the financial statements of this organization: pretty much an open pocketbook for these boys — their travel expenses alone in 2011 were over $850,000. Regardless if their ‘awareness/advocacy’ portion is 33 per cent, 45 per cent or higher, this is not contributions towards the people of these areas, it is used primarily in the production of their videos.

Here are some finds on the net in regards to the IC:

- In 2005 oil was discovered in Uganda. Tullow Oil involved. Chase Bank contributed $1 million to IC. Chase is also a major investor in Tullow Oil.

Untapped natural resources are huge in Africa, and too many countries are involved.

- October 2011. The US already authorized the deployment of 100 combat-equipped troops to central Africa, whose goal was to take Kony down.

- The Ugandan government and their army (SPLA) are as corrupt as the LRA.

- Joseph Kony is reportedly now in the Congo with a much decreased army, still causing havoc, but going into this area to hunt him down has been stated as a suicide mission at best.

If out of those 1,200 ‘friends’ that may have purchased the $30 kits, had they chosen instead to contribute, say, to the New Life Mission to help provide for the 8,400 meals to feed the homeless this Easter which will cost $26,124, these girls could in all retrospect have raised $36,000. My donation is $100 for New Life this Easter; I challenge everyone in Kamloops to meet that.

I get the desire to bring about awareness, but these girls did dive on the bandwagon. Putting your money toward an organization such as Save the Children’s Fund or the New Life Mission would be far more productive.

S. KLEIN 

Kamloops





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